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CREATING A SIMPLE PAGE

In this chapter, we’ll create a web page step-by-step so you can get a feel for what it’s like to mark up a document with HTML tags. The exercises allow you to work along. This is what I want you to get out of this chapter:

  • Get a feel for how markup works, including an understanding of elements and attributes.
  • See how browsers interpret HTML documents.
  • Learn how HTML documents are structured.
  • Get a first glimpse of a style sheet in action.

Don’t worry about learning the specific text elements or style sheet rules at this point; we’ll get to those in the following chapters. For now, just pay attention to the process, the overall structure of the document, and the new terminology

A WEB PAGE, STEP-BY-STEP

You got a look at an HTML document in Chapter 2, How the Web Works, but now you’ll get to create one yourself and play around with it in the browser. The demonstration in this chapter has five steps that cover the basics of page production:

Step 1: Start with content. As a starting point, we’ll write up raw text content and see what browsers do with it.

Step2: Give the document structure. You’ll learn about HTML element syntax and the elements that set up areas for content and metadata.

Step 3: Identify text elements. You’ll describe the content using the appropriate text elements and learn about the proper way to use HTML.

Step 4: Add an image. By adding an image to the page, you’ll learn about attributes and empty elements. Step

5: Change how the text looks with a style sheet. This exercise gives you a taste of formatting content with Cascading Style Sheets.

LAUNCH A TEXT EDITOR

In this chapter and throughout the book, we’ll be writing out HTML documents by hand, so the first thing we need to do is launch a text editor. The text editor that is provided with your operating system, such as Notepad (Windows) or TextEdit (Macintosh), will do for these purposes. Other text editors are fine as long as you can save plain-text files with the .html extension

Conclusion

We’re finished with the Black Goose Bistro page. Not only have you written your first web page, complete with a style sheet, but you’ve also learned about elements, attributes, empty elements, block and inline elements, the basic structure of an HTML document, and the correct use of markup along the way. Not bad for one chapter

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